The Oslo Agreement In 1993

The Oslo Agreement In 1993

The agreements essentially called for the withdrawal of Israeli forces from parts of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and reaffirmed the Palestinian right to autonomy in those territories through the establishment of an interim Palestinian authority of self-government. Palestinian rule is expected to last a five-year transition period, during which „permanent status negotiations“ would begin in order to reach a final agreement. Jerusalem`s new mayor, and then Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, rejected the deal and called it a „dark cloud over the city.“ He advocated bringing more Jews to East Jerusalem and expanding Jerusalem to the East. [6] In this context, negotiators from both sides met again, again at Camp David, in the hope of following up the Oslo Accords with a comprehensive peace treaty. The Oslo Accords are two agreements between the Government of Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO): the Oslo I Accords signed in Washington in 1993, D.C. [1] and the Oslo II Accords signed in Taba, Egypt, in 1995. [2] The Oslo Accords marked the beginning of the Oslo Process, a peace process aimed at reaching a peace treaty on the basis of UN Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 and respecting the „right of the Palestinian people to self-determination“. The Oslo process began after secret negotiations in Oslo, which resulted in the PLO`s recognition of the State of Israel and Israel`s recognition of the PLO as the representative of the Palestinian people and as a negotiating partner. Negotiations between Israel and the PLO, which eventually culminated in the Oslo Accords, began in 1993 in secret in Oslo, Norway.

Thus, the Oslo Accords had their skeptics on both sides and their number only increased when the process could not keep its promise. Many believe that Israel has benefited the most since negotiations began in 1993. While Peres, at the request of US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, had limited the construction of settlements,[24] Netanyahu continued construction inside existing Israeli settlements,[25] and presented plans for the construction of a new neighborhood, Har Homa, in East Jerusalem. However, it remained well below the level of the Shamir government of 1991-92 and gave up on building new settlements, although the Oslo Accords did not provide for such a ban. [24] Construction of housing units off Oslo: 1991-92: 13,960, oslo: 1994-95: 3,840, 1996-1997: 3,570. [26] With the Oslo Accords, Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) officially recognized each other for the first time…

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